phobs.deviantart.com

Russian artist with a mean streak of foreign wit and badassery.

The best description of this badass motherfucker out there. 

mysteryof1990:

Dante And Virgil In Hell
William-Adolphe Bouguereau
1850

I WILL ALWAYS REBLOG THIS PAINTING. THIS PAINTING IS SO AMAZING. IT IS, LIKE, THE REASON I LOVED NINTH GRADE. Oh god, I can’t - like, omg, THAT DANTE UNIT WAS FINE AS HELL (ha, did you see what I did there?).
ANYWAYS. Then I saw this at the Musee d’Orsay and cried tears of beauty and joy. 

mysteryof1990:

Dante And Virgil In Hell

William-Adolphe Bouguereau

1850

I WILL ALWAYS REBLOG THIS PAINTING. THIS PAINTING IS SO AMAZING. IT IS, LIKE, THE REASON I LOVED NINTH GRADE. Oh god, I can’t - like, omg, THAT DANTE UNIT WAS FINE AS HELL (ha, did you see what I did there?).

ANYWAYS. Then I saw this at the Musee d’Orsay and cried tears of beauty and joy. 

Oh god, I remember learning this in Humanities.
Stanton: “Michelangelo went balls out and just hacked his name on the Pieta. He was all, BITCH, I CARVED THAT, DON’T YOU FUCKING SAY I DIDN’T. THAT’S RIGHT, ASSHOLE. I’M A MOTHERFUCKING SCULPTOR.”
THEN GUESS WHAT JOB HE LANDS NEXT LOL. 
THE SISTINE CHAPEL.
Poor Mike. ):

Oh god, I remember learning this in Humanities.

Stanton: “Michelangelo went balls out and just hacked his name on the Pieta. He was all, BITCH, I CARVED THAT, DON’T YOU FUCKING SAY I DIDN’T. THAT’S RIGHT, ASSHOLE. I’M A MOTHERFUCKING SCULPTOR.”

THEN GUESS WHAT JOB HE LANDS NEXT LOL. 

THE SISTINE CHAPEL.

Poor Mike. ):

“Hugo kept his artwork out of the public eye, fearing it would overshadow his literary work. However, he enjoyed sharing his drawings with his family and friends, often in the form of ornately handmade calling cards, many of which were given as gifts to visitors when he was in political exile. Some of his work was shown to, and appreciated by, contemporary artists such as Van Gogh and Delacroix; the latter expressed the opinion that if Hugo had decided to become a painter instead of a writer, he would have outshone the artists of their century.”

Hugo kept his artwork out of the public eye, fearing it would overshadow his literary work. However, he enjoyed sharing his drawings with his family and friends, often in the form of ornately handmade calling cards, many of which were given as gifts to visitors when he was in political exile. Some of his work was shown to, and appreciated by, contemporary artists such as Van Gogh and Delacroix; the latter expressed the opinion that if Hugo had decided to become a painter instead of a writer, he would have outshone the artists of their century.”


These 9 drawings were done by an artist under the influence of LSD as  part of a test conducted by the US government in the late 1950’s. The  artist was given a dose of LSD 25 and free access to an activity box  full of crayons and pencils. His subject was the medic.

I’ve seen this before, but it’s still totally mind-boggling. The artist’s commentary (not included here) for each picture was pretty intense, too. 

These 9 drawings were done by an artist under the influence of LSD as part of a test conducted by the US government in the late 1950’s. The artist was given a dose of LSD 25 and free access to an activity box full of crayons and pencils. His subject was the medic.

I’ve seen this before, but it’s still totally mind-boggling. The artist’s commentary (not included here) for each picture was pretty intense, too. 

jimmypage:


The exterior and interior of the main rose window at Notre Dame in Paris, France. 

The rose window was seen as a mandala in the Middle Ages, which represents the “expression of human aspiration towards wholeness and coherence.” Mandalas have existed in Eastern religion and philosophy for centuries, and in modern thinking, the medieval rose window serves much the same purpose. The rose window operates on many levels: spiritual, meditative, and emotional. Abbot Suger’s observations underscore how deep an emotional and spiritual chord is struck by the play of light that passes through the glass, in which the physical majesty of the light was to inspire the same level of reverence one would get from reading the religious text of the Bible itself, but illiteracy was widespread in the era. The center of Eastern mandalas depict the “godhead” or divine aspect of the world, which rose windows sought to accomplish through architecture. Typically Christ or the Virgin and Christ are found in the central rosette of most windows. In eastern philosophy, there are many paths to reach the divine, and these are represented by “gates” at the cardinal points of the mandala. By the same token, saints depicted in the petals of a rose window can be seen as intermediaries (or paths) to Christ.

jimmypage:

The exterior and interior of the main rose window at Notre Dame in Paris, France.

The rose window was seen as a mandala in the Middle Ages, which represents the “expression of human aspiration towards wholeness and coherence.” Mandalas have existed in Eastern religion and philosophy for centuries, and in modern thinking, the medieval rose window serves much the same purpose. The rose window operates on many levels: spiritual, meditative, and emotional. Abbot Suger’s observations underscore how deep an emotional and spiritual chord is struck by the play of light that passes through the glass, in which the physical majesty of the light was to inspire the same level of reverence one would get from reading the religious text of the Bible itself, but illiteracy was widespread in the era. The center of Eastern mandalas depict the “godhead” or divine aspect of the world, which rose windows sought to accomplish through architecture. Typically Christ or the Virgin and Christ are found in the central rosette of most windows. In eastern philosophy, there are many paths to reach the divine, and these are represented by “gates” at the cardinal points of the mandala. By the same token, saints depicted in the petals of a rose window can be seen as intermediaries (or paths) to Christ.

allcatswatchtv:

Une Semaine de Bonté 2 by Max Ernst.

allcatswatchtv:

Une Semaine de Bonté 2 by Max Ernst.

In what has to be one of the most closely guarded secrets in TV history, the “couch gag” opening of tonight’s episode of The Simpsons was storyboarded and directed by none other than Banksy. It’s the first time an artist has been invited to storyboard part of the show and when you see it, you’ll be shocked that it made it past the network executives.”

Updates

watching: l'inconnu du lac
reading: dunk & egg
listening to: wicked
working on: animation short

anime expo 2014 | currently in boston