"Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”

Marcus Aurelius

"I don’t believe in any gods or goddesses, because they are so obviously human inventions. Desert-dwellers have severe, austere and dry gods; suffering and oppressed people have loving and merciful gods; farmers have gods of rain and fruitfulness; and I have never met a liberal who believed in a conservative God or a conservative who believed in a liberal one. Every God I have ever heard of bears the indelible marks of human manufacture, and through history we can explain how and why we invented them."
Andrew Copson
Chief executive, British Humanist Association 
Dante’s Inferno

We can better appreciate the density and complexity of Dante’s symbolism by looking at a single example. Our common image of Satan is that of a sly tempter (in popular art he is often in formal dress whispering blandishments in a willing ear with just a whiff of sulphur about him) after the manner of Milton’s proud, perversely tragic, heroic Satan in Paradise Lost. For Dante, Satan is a huge, stupid beast, frozen in a lake of ice in the pit of hell. He beats six batlike wings (a demonic leftover from his angelic existence) …

Beyond that, the whole complex of Satan is heavily weighted with symbolic significance. Satan lies in frozen darkness at a point in the universe farthest from the warmth and light of God. He is the fallen angel of light (Lucifer means “light-bearer”), now encased in a pit in the center of the earth excavated by the force of his own fall from heaven. Satan is immobile, compared to God, who is the mover of all things in the universe. He is totally inarticulate and stupid because he represents, par excellence, all of the souls of hell who have lost what Dante calls “the good of intellect.” Satan, and all the souls in hell, will remain totally unfulfilled as created rational beings because they are cut off from the final source of rational understanding and fulfillment: God. Intellectual estrangement from God is for Dante, as it was for Thomas Aquinas, the essence of damnation. This estrangement is most evident in the case of Satan, who symbolizes in his very being the loss of rationality and all that derives from that fact.

i get so emotional about these texts. i wish i had a poet dante action figure. i actually made a crusader dante plush for a friend. i have so many useless hobbies. and so many feelings.

I would not mind having to write the description panel that introduces an exhibit/gallery/work of art. 
These are my favourite things.

I would not mind having to write the description panel that introduces an exhibit/gallery/work of art. 

These are my favourite things.

rufustfirefly:


Stephen: The Garden of Eden. That’s where good and evil started.Philip Zimbardo: Why did the devil make Adam and Eve eat the apple?Stephen: Because he disobeyed the authority of God. He was non-conformist, doing his own thing, letting it all hang out, and he did not want to serve the ultimate authority like you say he shouldn’t and he turned out to be the ultimate evil. I’m sorry, the title of the book turns the argument on its head.Philip Zimbardo: No. Lucifer is God’s favorite angel, right?Stephen: Until he disobeys, go ahead.Philip Zimbardo: But why does he disobey? Because God says I have just created this perfect creature, Adam, and everybody had to obey him, and Lucifer says, ‘Wait a minute, it’s a mortal. Mortals are corruptible, we’re angels. I refuse.’ And that’s disobedience of authority, so the reason Lucifer as the devil seduced Adam is to say, ‘God, I’m right and you’re wrong. This guy is corruptible, he’s not somebody we should respect. He is just an ordinary mortal.’Stephen: But in that case, Lucifer was right.Philip Zimbardo: Lucifer was right and God was wrong. If God was into reconciliation he would have said, ‘I made a mistake.’ God created hell, paradoxically, it was God who created hell as a place to put Lucifer and the fallen angels, and had he not created hell, then evil would not exist.Stephen: No, evil exists because of the disobedience of Satan. God gave Satan, the angels, and man free will. Satan used his free will and abused it by not obeying authority. Hell was created by Satan’s disobedience to God and his purposeful removal from God’s love - which is what hell is, removing yourself from God’s love. You send yourself to hell; God does not send you there.Philip Zimbardo: Obviously, you learned well in Sunday School.Stephen: I teach Sunday School, motherfucker.



am neither christian nor religious, but this just stroked my hard-on for monotheism pretty well. mmmmmmmmmm gimme summa dat theology. (summa theologica, get it)

rufustfirefly:

Stephen: The Garden of Eden. That’s where good and evil started.
Philip Zimbardo: Why did the devil make Adam and Eve eat the apple?
Stephen: Because he disobeyed the authority of God. He was non-conformist, doing his own thing, letting it all hang out, and he did not want to serve the ultimate authority like you say he shouldn’t and he turned out to be the ultimate evil. I’m sorry, the title of the book turns the argument on its head.
Philip Zimbardo: No. Lucifer is God’s favorite angel, right?
Stephen: Until he disobeys, go ahead.
Philip Zimbardo: But why does he disobey? Because God says I have just created this perfect creature, Adam, and everybody had to obey him, and Lucifer says, ‘Wait a minute, it’s a mortal. Mortals are corruptible, we’re angels. I refuse.’ And that’s disobedience of authority, so the reason Lucifer as the devil seduced Adam is to say, ‘God, I’m right and you’re wrong. This guy is corruptible, he’s not somebody we should respect. He is just an ordinary mortal.’
Stephen: But in that case, Lucifer was right.
Philip Zimbardo: Lucifer was right and God was wrong. If God was into reconciliation he would have said, ‘I made a mistake.’ God created hell, paradoxically, it was God who created hell as a place to put Lucifer and the fallen angels, and had he not created hell, then evil would not exist.
Stephen: No, evil exists because of the disobedience of Satan. God gave Satan, the angels, and man free will. Satan used his free will and abused it by not obeying authority. Hell was created by Satan’s disobedience to God and his purposeful removal from God’s love - which is what hell is, removing yourself from God’s love. You send yourself to hell; God does not send you there.
Philip Zimbardo: Obviously, you learned well in Sunday School.
Stephen: I teach Sunday School, motherfucker.

am neither christian nor religious, but this just stroked my hard-on for monotheism pretty well. mmmmmmmmmm gimme summa dat theology. (summa theologica, get it)

Dante’s Inferno

We can better appreciate the density and complexity of Dante’s symbolism by looking at a single example. Our common image of Satan is that of a sly tempter (in popular art he is often in formal dress whispering blandishments in a willing ear with just a whiff of sulphur about him) after the manner of Milton’s proud, perversely tragic, heroic Satan in Paradise Lost. For Dante, Satan is a huge, stupid beast, frozen in a lake of ice in the pit of hell. He beats six batlike wings (a demonic leftover from his angelic existence; …

Beyond that, the whole complex of Satan is heavily weighted with symbolic significance. Satan lies in frozen darkness at a point in the universe farthest fom the warmth and light of God. He is the fallen angel of light (Lucifer means “light-bearer”), now encased in a pit in the center of the earth excavated by the force of his own fall from heaven. Satan is immobile, compared to God, who is the mover of all things in the universe. He is totally inarticulate and stupid because he represents, par excellence, all of the souls of hell who have lost what Dante calls “the good of intellect.” Satan, and all the souls in hell, will remain totally unfulfilled as created rational beings because they are cut off from the final source of rational understanding and fulfillment: God. Intellectual estrangment from God is for Dante, as it was for Thomas Aquinas, the essence of damnation. This estrangment is most evident in the case of Satan, who symbolizes in his very being the loss of rationality and all that derives from that fact.

ilovecharts:

via rebeccalando
Atheists are concerned about The Man!

ilovecharts:

via rebeccalando

Atheists are concerned about The Man!

LMAO. tongue(s). brutus, cassius, and judas be damned!

LMAO. tongue(s). brutus, cassius, and judas be damned!

"…a God who could make good children as easily as bad, yet preferred to make bad ones; who could have made every one of them happy, yet never made a single happy one; who made them prize their bitter life, yet stingily cut it short; who gave his angels eternal happiness unearned, yet required his other children to earn it; who gave his angels painless lives, yet cursed his other children with biting miseries and maladies of mind and body; who mouths justice, and invented hell—mouths mercy, and invented hell—mouths Golden Rules and foregiveness multiplied by seventy times seven, and invented hell; who mouths morals to other people, and has none himself; who frowns upon crimes, yet commits them all; who created man without invitation, then tries to shuffle the responsibility for man’s acts upon man, instead of honorably placing it where it belongs, upon himself; and finally, with altogether divine obtuseness, invites his poor abused slave to worship him!"
— Mark Twain; No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger.
"If there is a God, atheism must seem to Him as less of an insult than religion."
— Edmond de Goncourt
Updates

watching: les revenants
reading: a world of ice and fire
next convention: ctn expo | los angeles
working on:

dreamworks animation intern | ctn expo | currently in plano